1. A few questions for Lloyd Winter
What do you do? How does Portland play into your story? 
I’m an Art Director at Wieden + Kennedy. I write and draw and design and make a living being creative. At some point I will probably wake up from this dream, but Portland has been a major part of it. I studied Fine Art and Art Ed in Idaho and when I moved here I planned on being a art teacher, reserving personal art/design time for my summers and stuff. But I abandoned that path and the design community was open, and possessed a culture of giving which lent itself to self-taught weirdos like myself. Portland breeds a culture of collaboration over competition which is why design is thriving here.
How do you want to shape design in Portland? (Do you?) 
I don’t have any intentions toward shaping it. Design is shaped by so many things that seem beyond control. I try to focus mostly on the work, and just trust there’s a place for my output in the world, but I don’t know if I can assume how it will shape things. If anything it will just have a little Lloyd in it, and that sounds really great to me. I find being involved in the community of sharing and celebrating design has lead me to feel like I’m a part of something bigger, but I don’t do that with any real intentions of shaping things.
How does our city help you grow? How does it limit you?
I’ve had much growth here both professionally and personally. I’ve built a great life here with a good career, and a family and a beautiful place to live. The quality of life thing is true in Portland. Limits? Hmm. I’ve worked with people over the years here that talk about being able to make more money if they moved to Chicago, San Fransisco, or NYC, etc. If I wanted to make a ton of money. That could be limit, but honestly, I’m pretty happy with things here and don’t really listen to that stuff too much, the quality of work coming out of portland is astonishing, and the people here aren’t doing it for the cash, not to accuse people in those other places of doing so.
What are you looking forward to at DWP this year?
Honestly, I hope to not be too busy this year. The first year I was in the middle of moving, and last year I was slammed with work. I’m stoked to see Anna Telcs’ Creative Mornings talk because I met her this summer and I think she’s going to have a interesting perspective on creativity that I think a variety of people will find inspiring.
Recommend one great thing to see or do or eat in Portland.
Go see some live music.

    A few questions for Lloyd Winter

    What do you do? How does Portland play into your story? 

    I’m an Art Director at Wieden + Kennedy. I write and draw and design and make a living being creative. At some point I will probably wake up from this dream, but Portland has been a major part of it. I studied Fine Art and Art Ed in Idaho and when I moved here I planned on being a art teacher, reserving personal art/design time for my summers and stuff. But I abandoned that path and the design community was open, and possessed a culture of giving which lent itself to self-taught weirdos like myself. Portland breeds a culture of collaboration over competition which is why design is thriving here.

    How do you want to shape design in Portland? (Do you?) 

    I don’t have any intentions toward shaping it. Design is shaped by so many things that seem beyond control. I try to focus mostly on the work, and just trust there’s a place for my output in the world, but I don’t know if I can assume how it will shape things. If anything it will just have a little Lloyd in it, and that sounds really great to me. I find being involved in the community of sharing and celebrating design has lead me to feel like I’m a part of something bigger, but I don’t do that with any real intentions of shaping things.

    How does our city help you grow? How does it limit you?

    I’ve had much growth here both professionally and personally. I’ve built a great life here with a good career, and a family and a beautiful place to live. The quality of life thing is true in Portland. Limits? Hmm. I’ve worked with people over the years here that talk about being able to make more money if they moved to Chicago, San Fransisco, or NYC, etc. If I wanted to make a ton of money. That could be limit, but honestly, I’m pretty happy with things here and don’t really listen to that stuff too much, the quality of work coming out of portland is astonishing, and the people here aren’t doing it for the cash, not to accuse people in those other places of doing so.

    What are you looking forward to at DWP this year?

    Honestly, I hope to not be too busy this year. The first year I was in the middle of moving, and last year I was slammed with work. I’m stoked to see Anna Telcs’ Creative Mornings talk because I met her this summer and I think she’s going to have a interesting perspective on creativity that I think a variety of people will find inspiring.

    Recommend one great thing to see or do or eat in Portland.

    Go see some live music.

  2. PDX Granulated

    Written by taryncowart | Sep 30,2014

    NORTH is pleased to announce PDX Granulated as part of NORTH’s Sound Designed Panel during Design Week Portland.

    Composer and software developer Chris Carlson will mix, deconstruct and re-interpret field recordings captured in advance by attendees and the general public. What is the sound of Portland? What happens when recordings from all five quadrants of the city are re-imagined? You’re invited to contribute your recordings and your ears to a collective sonic performance.

    Want to contribute? Here’s how:

    1. Walk or sit or stand, stop and listen.
    2. Think of yourself as a microphone, spin around — how does this change the sounds you hear?
    3. Make a 15–30 second recording from a location in Portland, OR. You don’t have to record anything specific or musical — be experimental!
    4. Email the recording to NORTH. Please be sure to title the recording with your location (actual address, or intersection), and your name if you’d like. Then, send it to designweek@north.com. Please put #PDXGranulated #ListenWhereYouAre in the subject line.

    Recordings are due by 11:59pm on Sunday, October 5th.

    More detailed information on how to participate can be found here and here.

  3. Design Questions with Hannah Ferrara
Hannah Ferrara designs, produces and sells handmade jewelry under the name Another Feather. Her jewelry is sold through her website and in numerous stores across the country and abroad. She and her husband Malcolm Smitley recently moved to Portland from the East Coast.
Caleb: Tell me what you do.
Hannah: I’m a jewelry designer, maker, and small business owner. Is that what you want? <laughing>
Well, I ask the question because everyone answers it differently, and I think those differences are interesting. Why did you include the business owner part? Why is that on your mind right now?
I think it’s on my mind right now because we’ve been doing so much restructuring of the business plan. So I’m thinking about that more than I do most of the time. 
But yes, I think it’s such a big part of what I do. When I was interviewing people here in Portland to hire someone to help out at the studio I realized people have this idea of what I do and the business end not being part of it. <laughing> That we sit around and play all day and eat pie. And there are definitely fun times that are like that. But to actually live off of your work you have to do the business side of it as well. So that is definitely part of it.
[[MORE]]
Do you like the business side at all or does it feel like a necessary evil?
I used to completely detest it. I come from a fine art, studio art background and it wasn’t even touched on in my schooling. So I was against it for so long and then, once I realized that I had to do it for my work to progress, I kind of fought it for a while and eventually began to enjoy parts of it. 
I’ve realized that other people are way better at aspects of it than I am. I’ve learned over the years how to do it — I can do the invoicing, I can do the number-crunching. But I’ve now realized there’s an accountant that can do that way faster, and that my time is better spent designing other work or making things. So this past year I’ve put a lot of focus on giving up jobs to other people who are better at them and freeing me up to do the parts that I really enjoy. Which is not the number-crunching.
Do you find that the need to make money affects the choices that you’re able to make creatively?
I think it definitely does for the business. So I try to constantly be doing other things at the same time so that I’m not only making those types of decisions. Like collaborations or pop-up events or something else that gets me totally away from thinking about what’s going to sell… 
But when I’m actually designing and creating a new collection I don’t think about that at all. I try to not consider business, price point, fashion, trends. I just make pure work. And then I review it and kind of narrow it down to “Oh, how much did this cost to produce? How much would I be able to offer it for?” So I think the business part comes after for me, I have to look at it with a critical business eye later on instead of in the beginning. 
I never sit down and think, “All right, what do people want? What’s going to be a good seller?” I never think like that. I have friends who do it that way, and it totally works for them, but they might think that way naturally. And I just don’t.

Where are you from?
I’m from North Carolina, from Asheville, in the mountains.
Were you making and creating things as a kid?
Yes. When I was growing up I had severe ADD and ADHD, and my mom didn’t believe in medicating, so… <laughing> The only thing that did calm me down was when my hands were busy — making things or drawing or anything related to creating. Otherwise I was just running circles around the room. My parents recognized and kind of cultivated that. They tried to always have things for me to be working on, or would take me to the museum or art classes. 
I kind of always knew that if I went to college that’s what I would go for. I didn’t think I would have a production jewelry business by any means. I thought I would probably just be a conceptual fine artist, I never thought I would be on the business owner side of things.
Did you go to school for fine arts? Where did you go?
I did, yeah. I went to Appalachian State University, where I specialized in textiles and fiber, installation work, and jewelry design and metal smithing. Then I got another degree in art education, to teach art.
And how did you go from school to where you are now?
I actually started my business when I was in school, by accident. 

Whoops.
I was making conceptual work, small wearable sculptural work. I had all of these models, basically incomplete sample pieces. And when people would visit the studio those were the things that they wanted to take. I’d have friends who would ask, “Can you make me this? Can you do this?” 
I just started doing it on the side. I was working in a gallery part-time and paying my own way through school so anything that helped with that was great. I realized I could start making some of my own art forms in a more simplified, wearable version and sell it. At the time these were based off of larger bodies of work about memory, collections, and the objects we hold on to and they often incorporated found objects and natural materials. I ended up accidentally getting a lot of press for that, which was unexpected, and had to dive in headfirst. And I’ve been doing that ever since, kind of learning along the way. 
So how did the press attention happen?
I got a call one day, while I was in school, from the Today show. I thought it was a joke and I started laughing. They said they wanted to feature my jewelry on their show and I didn’t even own a TV, I didn’t know what network it was on. I overnighted my collection, which at the time wasn’t even a real collection, and just thought, “Oh, maybe this will happen, maybe it won’t.” Then they wrote me and said it would be on in three days. So I went over to a friend’s house and had a big breakfast and watched it. And there it was. 
After that it just kind of trickled down. I got a good bit of internet hype from blogs or people circulating imagery of the pieces and then stores inquired about carrying it. I didn’t take it seriously by any means until I graduated because I was so focused at the time on what I considered to be my real work.
I didn’t know anything about business, so for a while I just made the jewelry I wanted to get by and kind of keep it going. After a while I shut it down for a good six months to travel and really thought about whether this is what I wanted to do. Do I want to do this? Do I enjoy it? I decided to really leap in and do it.
So are you doing Another Feather work full time right now?
Yes. I do other projects, freelance work, stylist work, and still teach the occasional workshop on the side when I want.
Does the Another Feather work give you full satisfaction or do you have to do these other things to round it out?
I think parts of it really do. 
It’s more that I get concerned about it. Like any job that you enjoy and are passionate about it can be all-consuming, and that worries me a bit. I worry that, if all I do is focus on this 24/7, then it’s all I’ll be capable of down the line. And so I want to just make sure that I’m constantly doing other things and still being inspired in other mediums, not just constantly thinking about jewelry and doing jewelry-related things. 
But yes, I definitely enjoy it. I mean there are days, obviously, when I want to clock out and have a normal weekend or be like my friends who leave their job on Friday and don’t have to think about it again until Monday.
Where do you do your work?
Right now I’m working out of the top floor of our home. We’ve turned the full upstairs into a studio space and I share that with my husband. That’s been great. 
We just moved here in March. We were trying to figure out if we wanted to have separate studio and living spaces when we moved here but it was too hard to try and find both at the same time from the East Coast. So we settled on a home that had enough space that we could do both and then transition out once we got to know the community more and found a place that really made sense.

What’s essential for you in a workspace? What do you need to do the work and what doesn’t matter to you at all that might matter to others?
The number one thing I need is light, that’s the most important thing whenever we look at living spaces or work spaces. What is the lighting like throughout the day, throughout the year? Which direction does the building face? I just prefer to have my workspace in the windows, that’s when I feel the best. 
The thing that I don’t have to have that most creative people seem to need is music. I can work in silence for days. Usually in interviews they ask me, “What music do you listen to?” There are spurts where I want to listen to music but I definitely enjoy working in quiet. All of the tools and methods I use have very signature sounds and it’s kind of meditative to listen to them. When you’re filing there’s this really sharp sound and when you use a torch there’s this flick of the fire every time. So those are the sort of things I get into the rhythm of and I really enjoy.

Yeah I’m the same. At work, when someone’s playing music, I’ll put my headphones on and it’s just playing a recording of rain.
Really? That’s so funny. That’s nice to hear. Because I sometimes wonder…
Sometimes when you say you prefer silence people think you’re a serial killer.
Yeah, totally.
When really what it means is that you’re comfortable with yourself and don’t need to drown out the voices in your head.
<laughing>
What does your typical day look like?
Right now it’s a little different because it’s been so hot. Now I wake up really early and try and solder right away. So I do the torch work when it’s cool and breezy. And then, as the day gets warmer, I transition into doing the business roles like packaging things and writing emails and online updates and things like that. 
Normally I really enjoy having a ritualistic morning, so I wake up slowly, do yoga, spend some time reading, drinking coffee, eating a real breakfast, and then I do email and that sort of stuff before I spend all afternoon designing or making.
What important lessons do you think you’ve learned that you were only able to learn by actually doing the work?
One thing I’ve learned about myself is that I’m a terrible control freak. A serious control freak. And I’d never seriously thought about that before because I’d never really had to. But yeah, it can be difficult to hire people on and trust other people to do facets of your work. It was really hard for me, even though I was whining every day about how I couldn’t wear all these hats and do all of this running around and I wasn’t ever sleeping. And I was so relieved to finally have people to help.
I think that’s definitely been a good thing for me, personally, just learning to let go and let other people help.
Making work that really feels like my hand, my voice, was also something I had to learn. There were so many years where I was being told things like, “This is how you have a business, this is what you need to be doing as a jeweler, this is what I want to see in your collection during Market Week.” I thought, “Oh, I know nothing about this world, I should be listening to this.” So I learned the hard way that it’s not for everyone. That’s great for some people but it’s not for me. 
The few times I did take advice like that, and tried to make a sellable collection, they totally flopped. It was so stupid. <laughing> Yeah, so now, if I’m not feeling inspired and I’m not making work that I’m proud of, I’m not going to release anything new. I might come out with a new variation of our classic pieces but I’m not going to push work on people that I don’t feel good about. So that’s something I’ve learned. 
And just how to say no to things. I never want to do that. I hate saying no.

But saying no is sometimes necessary to make sure what you’re doing feels authentically yours, right?
Yes. And that was so important to me because, the couple of times I did take that kind of advice from others, I felt so crappy about it or wasn’t proud of the work. People would ask me, “What’s your new collection look like?” and I would just mumble, “Yeah, it’s alright.” I mean, I wasn’t wearing any of it myself, it just didn’t feel right. 
Do you ever think about getting away from the jewelry business?
Sure I do. I definitely daydream about making work that doesn’t have a particular purpose. I really do. Doing work just because I need to feel that feeling inside of me, where I spend weeks and weeks doing something just because I had an idea and I wanted to see it through.
Does that relate back to the authenticity thing? Or is that more about just taking a break?
I think it’s both of them, honestly. I mean, technically I can make whatever I want but the intention of my line is to make wearable pieces. So I’m not going to make some crazy giant installation piece and put it under the name of that company. But that’s the kind of work that I still want to do apart from Another Feather. It excites me in a different way. It’s a different part of my brain completely.
I really enjoy what I’m doing and I get to work with my hands almost every day. That’s so dreamy. I didn’t think that would happen. Especially in art school, where they basically told us, “You’re going to be starving and not have a job and you’re probably going to be waiting tables forever unless you become a professor.”
Setting realistic expectations.
Yes. So that’s just what I was okay with, I was fine with doing that. But now I feel so thankful that I actually get to make a living doing what I love.
What are you interested in right now? What’s capturing your imagination?
I’ve been thinking a lot about stuff — all of the stuff we keep, the stuff we have. This has been interesting to me my whole life and I think that any time we make a transition in our lives it comes back to the surface. 
Moving does that because you get rid of things, you leave things behind, and you have to acquire new things for your new space. Since we’re still working on that I’ve been thinking about it constantly. Why did we move with some of this stuff? Why did we bring that with us and then we got here and got rid of it? Or why were there things that, at the time we were leaving, I was so ready to just walk away from?
And I think about this with my work because I don’t want to be adding to that. I don’t want to be creating things that are trend-driven, that people are going to buy for a moment and then kind of just toss. I want to make work that lasts. For thousands of years jewelry has been passed on as heirlooms. And I think that kind of thing is important, especially nowadays, with everything being about technology and having such a short life, made to be tossed in a year or two and replaced with a new updated version. I seriously wonder about that. What are we going to have to give our grandkids? An iPod? What is there going to be to pass on? 
Malcolm and I have been talking about this a lot, trying to be intentional about the things we are putting into our home and also thinking about clutter. He is so minimal, he likes to pretty much own what he can carry, or have furniture that’s super functional and clean and minimal but easy to let go when the time is right. And I have more of this collecting mechanism in my brain where, when I go for a walk, we’re lugging back stones with us. But then I realize, when I have too many things lying around, even if they’re inspiring and beautiful, I feel like I’m choking, you know? I need white space to think clearly. 
Anyway, coming back to my work, I want to make pieces that are that way. Not overly fussy. So when someone’s wearing it you’ll notice it, there’s something unique about it, something architectural and different, but it’s not going to take away from that person. It’s going to enhance them and interact with their body and be something that later in life they’ll want to keep.
Interview by Caleb Yarian, photos by Ashley Forrette.

    Design Questions with Hannah Ferrara

    Hannah Ferrara designs, produces and sells handmade jewelry under the name Another Feather. Her jewelry is sold through her website and in numerous stores across the country and abroad. She and her husband Malcolm Smitley recently moved to Portland from the East Coast.

    Caleb: Tell me what you do.

    Hannah: I’m a jewelry designer, maker, and small business owner. Is that what you want? <laughing>

    Well, I ask the question because everyone answers it differently, and I think those differences are interesting. Why did you include the business owner part? Why is that on your mind right now?

    I think it’s on my mind right now because we’ve been doing so much restructuring of the business plan. So I’m thinking about that more than I do most of the time. 

    But yes, I think it’s such a big part of what I do. When I was interviewing people here in Portland to hire someone to help out at the studio I realized people have this idea of what I do and the business end not being part of it. <laughing> That we sit around and play all day and eat pie. And there are definitely fun times that are like that. But to actually live off of your work you have to do the business side of it as well. So that is definitely part of it.

    Read More

  4. A few questions for Factory North
What do you do? How does Portland play into your story?
Factory North is a full-service branding studio in Portland, OR, offering strategy, digital, print, and retail execution as well as comprehensive marketing services. We pride ourselves in our dedication to clear and honest communication both with our clients and through our design work.
We’re fortunate to live in a city where the caliber of creative work is set at such a high standard, we’re constantly inspired by the community of creatives in Portland. When looking for inspiration in the development of our own projects, we look to the history around us — whether it’s old industrial forms, neon signage, ghost signs, victorian etchings, or early 20th century maps. We want everything we make to have longevity and to be impeccably crafted, which is why we love to collaborate with Portland’s community of sign-painters, wood craftsmen, mural artists, and fabricators who all have deeply invested in their practice. Our craft would not be the same without the collaboration within our community.
How do you want to shape design in Portland? (Do you?)
There’s so much good design in Portland that we’re always pushing ourselves to cultivate our skills and look for new sources of inspiration. We’d like to help design to continue to evolve in Portland — we see trends that have become stagnant and it’s so exciting to see fresh styles popping up; we desperately need it as a city. 
How does our city help you grow? How does it limit you?
The wealth of support within the Portland design community is a huge asset. We’ll grab a coffee with studios of a similar size to us to swap stories of hardship &amp; triumph in order to help each other be more successful. The down side of this great community is that the saturation of designers drives project budgets lower.
What are you looking forward to at DWP this year?
Tyler is excited about attending the Stefan Sagmeister event. We’re also pretty pumped about the frozen margaritas that will be at our Open House.
Recommend one great thing to see or do or eat in Portland.
Depending on the mood — the Grasshopper at Pepe Le Moko or a Pickleback at The Woodsman Tavern.

    A few questions for Factory North

    What do you do? How does Portland play into your story?

    Factory North is a full-service branding studio in Portland, OR, offering strategy, digital, print, and retail execution as well as comprehensive marketing services. We pride ourselves in our dedication to clear and honest communication both with our clients and through our design work.

    We’re fortunate to live in a city where the caliber of creative work is set at such a high standard, we’re constantly inspired by the community of creatives in Portland. When looking for inspiration in the development of our own projects, we look to the history around us — whether it’s old industrial forms, neon signage, ghost signs, victorian etchings, or early 20th century maps. We want everything we make to have longevity and to be impeccably crafted, which is why we love to collaborate with Portland’s community of sign-painters, wood craftsmen, mural artists, and fabricators who all have deeply invested in their practice. Our craft would not be the same without the collaboration within our community.

    How do you want to shape design in Portland? (Do you?)

    There’s so much good design in Portland that we’re always pushing ourselves to cultivate our skills and look for new sources of inspiration. We’d like to help design to continue to evolve in Portland — we see trends that have become stagnant and it’s so exciting to see fresh styles popping up; we desperately need it as a city. 

    How does our city help you grow? How does it limit you?

    The wealth of support within the Portland design community is a huge asset. We’ll grab a coffee with studios of a similar size to us to swap stories of hardship & triumph in order to help each other be more successful. The down side of this great community is that the saturation of designers drives project budgets lower.

    What are you looking forward to at DWP this year?

    Tyler is excited about attending the Stefan Sagmeister event. We’re also pretty pumped about the frozen margaritas that will be at our Open House.

    Recommend one great thing to see or do or eat in Portland.

    Depending on the mood — the Grasshopper at Pepe Le Moko or a Pickleback at The Woodsman Tavern.

  5. Bridges of Portland by Fat Pencil Studio. Stop by their Open House during Design Week, Thursday October 09.

    Bridges of Portland by Fat Pencil Studio. Stop by their Open House during Design Week, Thursday October 09.

  6. ziggyreturns:


There’s a starman waiting in the sky.He’d like to come and meet us but he thinks he’ll blow our minds.

Waiting for the Starman by Tess Donohoe from At the Altar of a Starman: A Poster Art Tribute to Ziggy Stardust

A taste of what&#8217;s to come during Design Rocks.
Design Rocks: A Rock &#8216;n&#8217; Roll Art and Design Gala from MarsOctober 10, 7:00PM–Midnight

    ziggyreturns:

    There’s a starman waiting in the sky.
    He’d like to come and meet us but he thinks he’ll blow our minds.

    Waiting for the Starman by Tess Donohoe from At the Altar of a Starman: A Poster Art Tribute to Ziggy Stardust


    A taste of what’s to come during Design Rocks.

    Design Rocks: A Rock ‘n’ Roll Art and Design Gala from Mars
    October 10, 7:00PM–Midnight

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